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10 Ways to Kiss Processed Foods Goodbye and Get More Nutrition in Your Diet

 

processedkidsfood

We all need more nutrition in our diets – especially if you eat a lot of processed foods.

Processed foods are full of chemicals, preservatives, dyes, fake fats, and other harmful ingredients. And, packaged foods tend to have less nutrients due to the way they are produced, leaving you feeling hungry and unsatisfied soon afterward. You might even feel stomach cramping, have gas or diarrhea, and just feel rotten.

And guess what? Those are NOT normal!!!

Due to chemicals and engineering, processed foods can also alter your body’s tastes and desires, and make you crave more of what’s bad for you.

So you get stuck in a loop of eating processed foods. You are unmotivated, feel as though you don’t have enough time to cook. Maybe preparing real food from scratch seems too difficult and cost prohibitive.  And yet, the more you eat those foods, the worse you feel and the less energy you have.

Something’s gotta give.
 

Enter real, nutrient-dense foods

When food is grown in nutrient-rich soil and without chemicals, pesticides, hormones, antibiotics, and GMOs, which do have a negative impact on our health. Nutrient-content is always higher, and nutrients support health.
 

The result? You have more energy, less health issues, and you just feel better.
 
Here are 10 books that can help you improve the quality of your diet, with information about how to find, prepare, and entice you to improve the way you eat, achieve your goal of getting more nutrition out of your meals – and fit within your budget.
 
These authors have done the research and homework so you don’t have to…it’s easier than you think!
 
All these great books and 40+ others are included in the Extreme Health Library bundle being offered at a great price through MARCH 7th.
 

Thrifty Food Plan Experience / Millie Copper


 
Good health and good-eating can feel expensive but in Thrifty Food Plan Experience Millie Copper provides in-depth support in feeding a family of five on $172 per week, from a Weston A. Price Foundation dietary perspective. She provides 67 pages of thoughts, tips, and ideas plus a 2 week menu plan, over 40 recipes (and links to many more) to help you succeed.
 
(67 pages; PDF format; $8.95)
 

Off The Shelf / Kris Bordessa


Off The Shelf by Kris Bordessa gives you the tools to replace store-bought condiments, toppings, and snacks with healthier homemade alternatives. Complementing our products on giving up processed foods, these simple and beautiful recipes will allow you to say goodbye to food additives forever.
 
(43 pages; PDF format; $7)
 

100 Days of Real Food Challenge / Lisa Leake

A family with 2 young children in Charlotte, NC took a 100 Days of Real Food pledge. They didn’t eat a single ounce of processed food or refined ingredients for 100 days in the hopes that they would inspire people to follow suit. If you are new to a diet of unprocessed food, prepare to be inspired. Lisa Leake and the team at 100 Days of Real Food offer you meal plans, recipes, and tips to help you in your journey. They provide a quick guide to real food shopping as a bonus in this offer and have extensive free resources on their website for you to explore.
 
(73 pages PDF format; Bonus)

 

The Savvy Shopper’s Guide to Sustainable Food / Raine Saunders


 
Learn how to source health foods from sustainable sources, whether it is from local farms and farmer’s markets in your area, online merchants, delivery services, local grocery, or health food stores.
 
Learn to read labels, what to look for, what to avoid, and how to select and buy the best foods available for better health. Learn more about why supporting the sustainable food system is so important – and how it really can keep you healthy and feed the world.
(139 pages; PDF format; $24)

 

Nourishing Our Children

If you’ve heard of the dietary perspective of the Weston Price Foundation and wondered what it is all about, Nourishing Our Children: Timeless Principles For Supporting Learning, Behavior, and Health Through Optimal Nutrition from the San Francisco chapter spells out its philosophy in a beautiful and easy-to-read format.

The e-book provides dietary principles for parents to follow before and after conception, as well as recommendations on how to nourish rather than merely feed their children. It also covers the problems associated with modern processed foods and vital information about water and fluoride, traditional fats and oils, milk, soy, vital nutrients, and healthy meal preparation.

 

(97 pages; PDF format; $20)
 

Broth: Elixir Of Life / Patricia Lacoss-Arnold.

Our ancestors made use of every part of the animal to nourish them, including the bones. Bones are rich in calcium and other minerals; bones contain collagen which brings elasticity to the skin; bones are rich in gelatin which aids in digestion. Using bones to make broth is a key strategy to extract bone nutrients and add them to your diet.

Patricia Lacoss-Arnold in Broth: Elixir of Life will describe how to make and use broth in your every day cooking. If you have ever wonder how to make broth from beef, chicken, fish or even rabbit bones, you will soon learn about the flavors of these different options.
 
(59 pages; PDF format; $8.99)
 

Eat More Leafy Greens / Cynthia Lair.

How do you choose, chop, and cook your greens? What greens are best in a raw salad? If you are new to greens, Cynthia Lair in Eat More Leafy Greens provides you with an excellent orientation for getting started.
 
How do you know if a particular green is best eat cooked or raw? Check the list of greens in this 20-page guide or use one simple tip that Cynthia will teach you.
 
(20 pages; PDF format; $6.99)
 

Rebuild from Depression: A Nutrient Guide / Amanda Rose, Ph.D. and Annell Mavrantonis, M.D.


 
Rebuild from Depression: A Nutrient Guide, Including Depression in Pregnancy and Postpartum identifies seven nutrients most commonly associated with depression in the medical literature, including Omega 3 in fish oil, B vitamins, vitamin D, iron, magnesium, and zinc. They provide readers with tools to: (1) Identify a nutrient deficiency, (2) Locate the best supplements / vitamins for depression, and (3) Select and prepare foods to maximize those nutrients in their diets.
 
The ebook opens with Rose’s biography of depression and psychosis. She makes a compelling claim: My grandmother died at the age of sixty-one from complications of postpartum depression. Rose argues that her grandmother showed signs of nutrient deficiencies in her twenties, did not correct them, and suffered a life of depression, diabetes, and heart disease, all of which share a common nutrient deficiency: Omega 3 fatty acids.
 
(200 pages; PDF format; $19.97)
 

Divine Dinners: Gluten-Free, Nourishing, Family-Friendly Meals / Lydia Joy Shatney


 
Lydia Joy Shatney offers Divine Dinners: Gluten-Free, Nourishing, Family-Friendly Meals complete with 75 recipes to help you create menus full of wonderful, gluten-free dinners. With meat-based entrees and a collection of side dishes, soups, sauces, dips, and spreads, you will spend weeks cooking through this cookbook.
 
(104 pages; PDF format; $14.95)
 

The Five Flavors of Food /Lisa Mase

Lisa Mase of Harmonized Cookery shares “The Five Flavors of Food: Combining Ingredients Into Harmonious Meals.” To satisfy the whole being, Traditional Chinese Medicine encourages including five flavors in each meal: sweet, sour, salty, pungent, and bitter. The five flavors correspond to the five elements: Earth, Wood, Water, Metal and Fire. Planning menus that incorporate these elements and flavors, we can start to recognize which foods help us harmonize with our environment and the seasons.
 
(4 pages; PDF format; Bonus)
 

To buy these and all the other great health titles in this bundle, click here to visit the Extreme Health Library page for more information.

Ends Thursday March 7th at midnight, PST.
 

Giveaways Green Living Healthy Living Recipes Reviews

Real Food Fermentation by Alex Lewin: Book Review & Giveaway

www.mypicshares.com

I am a big advocate for fermented foods, and have committed to making them a regular part of my dietary habits. That’s why I am reviewing another great book about fermentation this week, Alex Lewin from Feed Me Like You Mean It’s recent book Real Food Fermentation.

Whether you are new to fermenting and are intrigued…or have already been doing it for a period of time, this wonderful book with gorgeous pictures (I’ve considered adding it to my coffee table collection for that reason) will delight any reader who is curious about flavors and textures, and the important role that microbes, enzymes, and bacteria play in preserving food.

It will also help you to appreciate that the art (yes, art) of culturing food is really one of the best and simplest ways to incorporate these essential living enzymes, good bacteria (probiotics), and increased vitamins and minerals in your diet for improved health.

Why make fermented foods, anyway?

You may be wondering what’s so great about fermented foods. They support digestion, immunity, and overall health by breaking down the elements in foods that our bodies might not otherwise be able to do and making nutritional elements more available. For an overview of the benefits of fermented foods, read The amazing health benefits of fermented & cultured foods & beverages. These foods support digestion, immunity, and overall health.

We are currently seeing a resurgence in interest of creating fermented foods for flavor and health, and what better time of year to learn something new like this than during the holiday season when there is so much focus on food anyway. This book would make a great gift for someone special in your life who loves and appreciates food and is perhaps thinking about taking their health to the next level.

What you’ll get out of this book and learning to ferment

In this book you’ll find basic recipes for fermented vegetable creations such as sauerkraut and pickles, kimchi, pickles, pico de gallo and more adventurous foods like hard apple cider, kombucha as well as a whole array of cultured dairy foods such as yogurt, whey, kefir, and crème fraîche, butter, and buttermilk (swoon!).

Recipes include clear instructions accompanied by images showing the reader just what his or her efforts will yield at various steps, and in effect bring to life the recipes discussed. I appreciate that, and I think someone who is just starting out on adventures in fermentation would too.

After meeting Alex in person, I have found that his book is written in a manner that is every bit as conversational as if you were actually talking to him.  His relationship with food is very comfortable and it’s evident that he’s delighted to share his knowledge with the reader.

As you read this book, you’ll discover that it’s meant to be read not at all in the way you’d approach most “cookbooks”, but as a way to become better acquainted with, enthused about, and as a way to unleash the desire to understand food and experiment in the kitchen in ways you may never have felt you could.  I hope the way he writes about food will not only compel you in this direction, but will inspire you to want to investigate this fascinating world of fermented foods, and try something for yourself.

I love the friendly, open explanations Alex provides  about how enzymatic activity and oxidation occur, and definitions of preservation and fermentation – which helps remove the mystery from the unique process of fermentation and how it can benefit health…as well as the conditions under which optimal fermentation occurs. There is also some valuable discussion of the ways in which the slow food movement has taken form and how it is affected by the mainstream, commercial food system, and genetic modification, and other factors.

In this recent radio interview, Alex talks about the qualities of fermented foods and why they are so good for our health. In a world where so many people have digestive compromise from poor lifestyle and dietary habits, fermentation reduces the stress on the body of creating enzymes for digestion. Raw foods are more difficult to digest, and fermented foods which really fall between raw and cooked are actually easier because microbes and enzymes act on the parts of the raw foods that our bodies have trouble assimilating.

Here is one of the fabulous recipes in his book:

Fermented Carolina-Style Slaw

www.mypicshares.com

Yield: 1 quart (950 ml) or 2 pounds (900 g)

Prep time: 20 minutes

Total time: 4-7 days

Ingredients:

1 pound (450 g) green cabbage

1 large onion (red, yellow, or white)

1 large green bell pepper

1 large carrot

1/2 apple (optional)

1/4 pound (115 g) celery root, or 1 teaspoon celery seed

4 teaspoons (20 g) sea salt

1/4 cup (80 g) honey (or less, if you have included an apple)

6 tablespoons (90 ml) oil (mixture of sesame, coconut, and olive oil works well)

2 teaspoons dry mustard

1 piece (1/3 inch, or 8 mm) gingerroot, peeled and grated (optional)

Freshly ground black pepper

Equipment

  • Large cutting board (wood is ideal)
  • Large knife (a chef’s knife is ideal)
  • Large mixing bowl
  • 2 mason jars (1 pint, or 475 ml each) or similar glass jars with tight-fitting lids
  • Colander or strainer

Preparation

  1. Thinly slice the cabbage, onion, and bell pepper. (For tips on how to cut a bell pepper, see page 65.)
  2. Grate or shred the carrot, apple, if using, and celery root, if using.
  3. Ferment the vegetable mixture with the salt using the recipe for Lacto-Fermented Vegetables on page 75 (here’s a link on his site to this recipe), to the desired degree of sourness. Four to seven days is probably about right.
  4. Once the vegetables are fermented, drain them in a colander set over a mixing bowl, and press the liquid out with your hands, reserving the liquid.
  5. Combine 1/2 cup (120 ml) of the liquid with the honey, oil, dry mustard, and ginger, and mix well with a fork, whisk, or blender. Pour the dressing mixture and combine. Add salt and pepper as needed. Add more of the reserved liquid if you want more sourness. Refrigerate.
  6. Save any leftover fermentation liquid to use as a starter for your next project. Or mix it with oil and spices to use as a salad dressing. or drink it in the morning as a digestive tonic!

Alex studied math at Harvard University before graduating from the Cambridge School of Culinary Arts, as well as the Institute for Integrative Nutrition. He also serves on the board of the Boston Public Market Assocation, and teaches people how to put fermenting into action.

You can read more about what Alex is up to by visiting his blog Feed Me Like You Mean It site or on his Facebook page.

Listen to Alex’s interview about his book with Cary Nosler on Talk 650 KSTE, on Wide World of Health (Sacramento, CA).

Win a copy of Real Food Fermentation!

Giveaway rules:

The giveaway starts today and ends on Wednesday, December 20th at 11:59 p.m., MST.
Here are all the different ways to enter:

  1. Click in the comment box below and leave a comment saying you want to enter.

For extra entries, do the following and leave comments:

  1. Subscribe to my blog. Use the Feedburner subscribe feature on the main page.
  2. Like Feed Me Like You Mean It on Facebook (blog posts on Facebook about giveaways aren’t permitted by FB rules). You’ll receive extra entries for “liking” only.
  3. Follow Lactoferment on Twitter and Tweet about the giveaway.
  4. Follow Agriculture Society on Twitter.
  5. Like Agriculture Society on Facebook (again, blog post about giveaways on FB are not permitted). Extra entries are given for “liking” only.
  6. Please Stumble my page or any other articles you want to share!

The contest is open to anyone in the U.S. If you are outside the U.S. you must pay shipping charges. The winner has 24 hours to e-mail me about the prize. If I don’t hear from the winner, I’ll pick someone else with Random.org.

Best of luck to everyone entering. I will announce the winner here on Thursday, December 20th.

Photo credit: Quarry Books