Category Archives: Green Living

Information and ideas about existing on this Earth and trying not to make too much of a mess about it.

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Will You Oppose Monsanto and Big Biotech?

amyrainemonsanto

The opposition is rising!

This past May, the world Marched Against Monsanto to show its disapproval of GM foods and seeds in the agricultural sector, marketplace and in our food supply.

I attended in my local area (Boise, ID) with my son and met up with friends and family to support my community in saying no to GM seeds and products. There were hundreds of people in attendance and I was very encouraged by the passionate crowds.  We marched from Julia Davis Park down Capitol Boulevard to the State Capitol Building less than a mile away.

What are GMOs?

From the Non-GMO Project:

“GMOs, or “genetically modified organisms,” are plants or animals that have been genetically engineered with DNA from bacteria, viruses or other plants and animals. These experimental combinations of genes from different species cannot occur in nature or in traditional crossbreeding.

Virtually all commercial GMOs are engineered to withstand direct application of herbicide and/or to produce an insecticide. Despite biotech industry promises, none of the GMO traits currently on the market offer increased yield, drought tolerance, enhanced nutrition, or any other consumer benefit.

Meanwhile, a growing body of evidence connects GMOs with health problems, environmental damage and violation of farmers’ and consumers’ rights.”

If you are new to GMOs, read this post Busting Myths About GMOs.

The most common GM crops are: 

  • Soybeans
  • Corn
  • Sugar beet
  • Sugar cane
  • Potatoes
  • Tomatoes
  • Papaya
  • Rice
  • Canola
  • Cotton
  • Alfalfa
  • Squash/zucchini

Source

Are GMOs safe?

Watch Jeffery Smith interview Dr. Stephanie Seneff, PhD. about Glyphosate (the active ingredient in Monsanto’s flagship product, Roundup) and how the Western Diet has greatly contributed to gastrointestinal disorders, heart disease obesity, autism, infertility, cancer and Alzheimer’s disease.

Read all the details from the study done by Stephanie Seneff and Anthony Samsell showing how Glyphosate contributes to many modern diseases.

A recent study conducted at Flinders and Adelaide Universities in Australia shows that pigs eating GM feed are experiencing gastrointestinal inflammation and reproductive issues.

Most of the information claiming that GMOs are safe comes from sources which stand to gain from the profits of GMOs. If you follow the money trail on studies supporting favorable or no-harm outcomes from using GM technology, or which show organic food is no better than conventional or GM food, you will find these studies are funded by biotechnology companies themselves or other entities connected to these corporations.

Bias in industry studies

One of the biggest problems in finding non-biased research is that more and more we are witnessing corporations merging with educational facilities and also government agencies.

Here’s one example: Stanford Study on Organics: Manipulating Consumers into Buying GMO Products.

Here’s a testimonial from Thierry Vrain, former research scientist for Agriculture Canada, now promoting awareness on the dangers of GM foods.  Thierry refutes biotechnology claims that GM seeds bring higher yields, require less use of pesticides, that their technology is safe and that it has no negative environmental impact.

Vrain believes there is definite industry bias in scientific studies produced from these sources. Most of these studies are focused on field performance of engineered crops, and conclusions always come out in favor of GM safety for human consumption and environmental impact.

How can I avoid GMOs?

GMOs are prevalent in our food supply. If you are buying any type of processed foods, the likelihood of GM material appearing in these products is high.

It’s also difficult to avoid even if you are not buying processed foods and buy foods from local farmers. It’s always important to ask farmers questions to find out if they are using GM seeds, feed or other material in their farming practices.

Here are 4 ways to avoid GMOs in the foods you buy.

More information:

Institute for Responsible Technology

Moms Across America

Suggested books:

Genetic Roulette DVD: –> http://amzn.to/14ZWicn

Seeds of Deception, paperback: –> http://amzn.to/11sipSU

Kindle version: –> http://amzn.to/11f9vwr

No Kindle? No problem. Download a free kindle reader app for all your devices here —>http://amzn.to/ZbRIHS

How do you avoid GMOs?

Green Living Guest Posts Probiotics Real Food Reviews

Getting Started with Fermented Foods, With Wardee Harmon

fermentedsoda
I’d like to share an introduction to my good friend Wardee Harmon’s e-book Lacto-Fermentation. Wardee is a wonderful and passionate educator and blogger on the subject of fermentation as well as other real food and natural health topics.
 

If you are new to fermenting, you’ll discover a bit about the benefits of fermented foods, why you might want to make them yourself rather than buy at the store, and get some inspiration for doing your own preparation.
 

Lacto-Fermentation is a companion ebook to the online Lacto-Fermentation ecourse on her blog GNOWFLGINS. In this book you’ll learn to make sauerkraut, condiments, preserves, relishes, pickles, kvass, kombucha, and much more. 
 

Her other book The Idiot’s Guide to Fermenting Foods is already on my shelf and I am thrilled to have this one in my collection as well.
 

Some years ago when I first started fermenting, I was pretty intimidated.  But as I discovered, the process is not difficult. And once you get going, it’s really fun.   I always feel motivated by the fact that I know the fermented foods I make are not only delicious but also have increased nutrient value over just eating those same foods raw or cooked. Now I can’t imagine my life without these probiotic-rich foods; including them in my daily diet has improved my health in ways I never knew possible.
 
I would have loved to get my hands on a great book like this with which to begin my journey into fermenting. Wardee definitely makes learning how to ferment fun and easy, something any beginner will appreciate.  
 

Wardee’s book Lacto-Fermentation is one of  the many superb offerings in the Extreme Health Digital Library, with 50+ health & wellness titles – e-books, videos, white papers, and more with a value of over $800…available for just $39.97 (each title costs just .75 cents each) all day today, March 7th until midnight at 12 a.m. PST.

 

What are fermented foods?

I heard recently that “ferment” would be the health buzz word of 2013.
 

The word ferment, when you use it together with food, can be a little scary for some people. The ick factor is high. But the good news is, this is lessening as more and more people become aware of the health benefits of fermented foods and become accustomed to the complex, sweet-sour-salty taste.
 

I’m happy to be a guest here today. Raine’s a good friend and she asked me to talk about the benefits of fermented foods, the advantages of making them yourself, and also give you some encouragement and tips for getting started. So that’s what I’m going to do.
 

First, what’s so great about fermented foods? Get ready! They’re really, really awesome.

Wait: I think I’d better explain what’s happening when a food is fermented. I’m talking about a particular type of fermentation — lacto-fermentation. What’s happening is that beneficial organisms, called lactobacilli, are encouraged to eat the food and proliferate throughout the food (this process is also called culturing). While they’re eating, they’re producing an acid that effectively preserves and protects the food form spoiling. Also they’re making the food better for us.
 

Here’s where the benefits come in.

Fermented foods experience a nutrition boost. Minerals are more readily absorbed, vitamin and enzyme content increases, the beneficial acid (lactic acid) aids in digestion and overall health, beneficial organisms re-populate the gut to increase the health of our immune system and overall health, and foods get pre-digested, making them more digestible for us. It really is a miraculous and highly beneficial process!
 

So, next question. Why would someone (namely, you) want to go to all the trouble of making fermented foods yourself?

Keep in mind, you certainly don’t have to make them yourself to get the benefits. There are merchants making high-quality fermented foods and you can find them in the cooler of your health food store or health food department — Kombucha, kvass, sauerkraut, old-fashioned pickled, cheese… These foods are really delicious and I love supporting these companies when I can’t make something myself.
 
But when you make them yourself, you’ll save money — all those bottles of Kombucha add up! Also, you can tweak flavors to get unique results and tastes all your own. Or perhaps you’ve just got gobs of garden produce to put up. Well, fermenting is a whole lot easier than canning, because the fermenting organisms do all the “cooking” while you sit back and wait for their work to be done. Plus, fermenting is more nutritious than canning. (You do need cold storage, like a cellar, to keep fermented foods long term. If you don’t have a cellar, certainly consider fermenting on an as-needed basis.)
 

Now let me encourage you to get started.

A lot of people think that if they don’t like sauerkraut, they won’t like other fermented foods. This is simply not true. So many foods can be fermented, and with so many different end flavors, that I’m pretty sure every person can find a fermented food to like. My eBook, Lacto-Fermentation, shares recipes to ferment practically every food group. You’ll create kefir and yogurt and real sour cream, cheese, sourdough bread, probiotic ice cream, pickles, chutneys, relish, salsa, beverages, and even pickled meats.
 
For the person who is particularly wary of sour foods, I’d recommend venturing into the world of fermented foods with one of these more mild ferment recipes (found on my blog): fruit chutney, fermented guacamole (video included), fermented ketchup, or fermented cranberry-apple-orange relish, just to name a few. Each of these recipes uses simple, real and whole food ingredients, and no special equipment other than jars or crocks — and a little time for the organisms to do their thing.
 
Doesn’t sound so hard, does it? And it sounds delicious, right? So get out there and get fermenting!

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I’d like to thank Wardee for kindly providing a great introduction to fermented foods. Now, aren’t you a little more motivated to learn more about these beneficial foods and get healthier?  :)
 

To purchase this book…

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