GAPS-friendly, Grain-Free Pancakes w/Vanilla, Cinnamon, & Raw Honey

www.mypicshares.com

Here’s my answer to everyone’s pancake craving that is gluten-free, grain-free, and guilt-free in every sense of the word.

These pancakes are so easy, even the most throw-away cook will love making them.  A great alternative to allergy-inducing and health problem causing gluten and grains, these fabulous cakes can be made in a variety of ways…the sky’s the limit!

I found this recipe on Mark’s Daily Apple (I added sea salt to ours). The best part about pancakes is what you put on them.  We all know pancakes are a great delivery mechanism for butter, right? Here’s your opportunity to slather your breakfast with plenty of traditional fats for brain, heart, immune system, and endocrine health. We used grass-fed butter or ghee and coconut oil for cooking.

Toppings? Here’s what we used: fresh strawberries, home-made sour cream, real butter and real maple syrup.

There are endless variations and you can pretty much use anything you have in your kitchen that you like:

blueberries, bananas, mangoes, blackberries, raspberries, crispy nuts, coconut oil, ghee, cream cheese, yogurt, kefir, cinnamon, cardamon, nutmeg, cloves, dehydrate coconut, raisins, sprinkled rapdura, sucanat, coconut date sugar, raw honey…getting hungry yet?  Use raw honey for a sweetener if you are on GAPS, otherwise you can use real maple syrup. Use your imagination!

www.mypicshares.com

And after tasting these, I promise you will leave far behind packaged, pre-mixed pancake batters from the grocery store, artificially-produced “maple syrup”, sugary fruit sauces, and embrace the yummy flavor of all these wholesome ingredients together for breakfast.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup almond flour
  • 3 eggs (from pastured hens, preferred)
  • 1/8 vanilla extract
  • 1/8 to 1/4 tsp. ground cinnamon (more if you prefer a more cinnamon-y taste)
  • pinch of sea salt

Directions:

  1. Heat a pan on your stove with butter, ghee or coconut oil.
  2. Mix all ingredients together into a batter.
  3. When well mixed, pour small amounts into your greased pan and cook on both sides until brown. These pancakes should be on the small side (4-5 inches in diameter) as larger pancakes don’t stay together well when you try flipping them over.
  4. Remove from pan and garnish with all your favorite goodies.

More breakfast recipes:

Apples fried in butter topped with yogurt, sprouted nuts, raisins, and maple syrup
Home-made granola – sweet, crunchy bliss!
Make- your-loved-ones-happy breakfast

10 Comments

  • Shannan
    July 20, 2011 - 6:03 PM | Permalink

    What if you have a nut allergy?

  • July 21, 2011 - 1:11 PM | Permalink
  • Martha
    July 21, 2011 - 4:03 PM | Permalink

    I’m going to try these on Saturday. Thank you! I think I’ll try them without the vanilla as I just realized that my homemade vanilla probably has grain it in and I’m on GAPS.

  • Julianna
    July 21, 2011 - 6:23 PM | Permalink

    Great recipe, thank you! I use organic eggs but am trying to stop using them, so I’m going to try a suggestion & see if it works. On a ground flaxseed package I have, it says eggs can be substituted with the flaxseed in this way: 1 TBS flaxseed meal + 3 TBS water for every egg to substitute. So in this case, 3 TBS flaxseed meal + 1/2 cup water + 1 TBSP water. Let sit 2 minutes, then add to recipe.

  • July 21, 2011 - 6:33 PM | Permalink

    Julianna – Why are you trying to stop using eggs? There is a big difference in nutrition between organic eggs and those from pasture-raised hens. Organic eggs can still come from hens that are confined and fed soy, corn, and grains, which offsets their nutritional balance of Omega 3s, CLA (conjugated linoleic acid), and Vitamins A & D.

    I would avoid using flaxseeds for cooking, their fats are fragile and go rancid in high temperatures. Flaxseeds also contain a lot of phytoestrogen, which can cause imbalance in the body and lead to inflammation.

    • Julianna
      July 22, 2011 - 1:29 PM | Permalink

      Hi Raine,

      I hadn’t heard that the oil in flaxseeds was that fragile. It’s used in countless recipes for folks with gluten intolerance. Any oil can go rancid at high temperature though, not just flax. Eggs can cause all kinds of problems, from the saturated fat content (the lecithin is destroyed if the yolk is cooked, rendering it a harmful fat), and allergy. It’s really difficult to trust what an egg producer is feeding chickens – organic can mean corn that contains Bt, because it is “naturally occurring” pesticide. I’m trying to eat vegan these days is another reason I’m trying to avoid eggs. I’m not a purist but if you only knew what health problems I just overcame through diet alone, you’d know I’m very aware of foods that can cause me problems. I still think your recipe is good, I’m actually trying it today. But with the flaxseed meal. It might not be fluffy at all & be a complete flop.

  • July 22, 2011 - 1:58 PM | Permalink

    Julianna – I hear what you are saying about having health issues, I’ve had plenty of them. Currently, I am on the GAPS diet (Dr. Natasha Campbell McBride’s protocol for anyone with digestive issues which can lead to myriad health problems) which is very high in protein and fats. I’m doing so much better than I was. In January, I was in a constant state of panic and anxiety, and felt like I was going to jump out of my skin almost 24 hours a day. I wasn’t sleeping at night for nearly 3 months. I couldn’t understand why I was having such acute health issues because I had eaten a healthy, traditional diet for the last 6 years. The reason I was not improving the way I needed to was that even though I cleaned up my diet, I failed to clean up, detoxify, and heal my digestion from damage of years and years of eating processed, toxic foods. Even when you are eating healthy, if your digestion is compromised, you won’t be able to digest those foods at all, and that is exactly what was happening to me.

    I have always eaten a lot of eggs, and in particular, raw egg yolks in raw milk yogurt/kefir smoothies everyday to eliminate the possibility of damaging nutrients in the egg. I also eat cooked eggs too, and I’ve heard of the damage that can happen to them when cooked (as with anything that gets cooked). Flaxseeds are fragile because they are very high in the essential fatty acid Omega 3 and polyunsaturated fats – unlike stable saturated fats – which can turn helpful nutrients into harmful ones, similar to other polyunsaturated oils such as sunflower and safflower oil. For this reason, flaxseed oil goes rancid very quickly as well, which is why it should always be refrigerated. At any rate, that’s just what I’ve learned in my health journey. I do hope you enjoy the recipe! :)

    • Julianna
      July 22, 2011 - 3:17 PM | Permalink

      Thanks again Raine, I tried the recipe with the flaxseeds. It was too thick so I added a couple tablespoons of non-GMO organic soymilk. They actually turned out wonderfully fluffy. I cooked them in coconut oil and actually tossed in some organic, unsweetened flaked coconut too. Delish. I think you & I can agree, it’s so difficult to avoid toxic foods! Even when we think we are, we hear more about how even pure foods can be bad (like heating flaxseeds). I guess we choose the least of what we think is harmful. It’s great you healed yourself. I had a doctor induced illness of pancreatitis (from flushing out a gallstone), which further caused pancreas damage that led to diabetes. To completely rest my pancreas (along with taking an Ayurvedic herb, Gymnema Sylvestre), I have to avoid most carbs from grains, grains, sugars, and meats that are fed those things. Eggs are in that category too, unfortunately. Because of this, after 2 lab tests, my doctor has declared me no longer diabetic but I still follow this diet.

  • July 22, 2011 - 3:51 PM | Permalink

    Julianna – you are most welcome! I’m glad your effort with the pancakes turned out well. We all certainly need to do what is best for our own health, and I wish you much success on your health journey. Your situation does not sound pleasant, and I fear that so many people have experienced damage to their digestion from years and years of poor eating and lifestyle. I had a nutritional therapist tell me that I had insulin resistance and a hiatal hernia, and could have been very easily on my way to getting cancer had I not stopped my habits.

    It’s different for us all, but I do maintain that sticking to whole, unadulterated foods is the best policy. I have read in numerous places and from different practitioners and individuals who were trying to heal themselves that often the culprit of problems with meats, eggs, and fats is either the source or the condition of the digestive tract of the individual, or both. The source is of course critical, and any animal or bird being fed soy, corn, or grain is going to produce meat or eggs that is less than optimal, which is why sustainable-raised animals and birds on pasture is the ideal. As with me, my digestion never fully healed because I didn’t take the necessary steps to “heal and seal” my gut (as Dr. McBride explains in her book), even though I was eating a traditional diet with nutrient-dense foods. I couldn’t absorb them and that was a problem. I have essentially been missing out on all the great nutrients from the food I’ve been eating since my gut was still damaged and couldn’t absorb it. It’s no wonder so many people have health issues, most of us have damaged digestive tracts which can’t digest much of anything.

    I have read that it can take 2-3 years to heal the digestive tract once the GAPS diet is begun (and that’s for people who have had a poor diet and lifestyle and who haven’t changed their habits yet), so I’m expecting at least 9 mos to a year for myself since I’ve already been on a traditional diet for so long. Good luck to you Julianna, and I hope your healing journey is all downhill! :)

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