Search Results for: digestive

Green Living Healthy Living

Using Herbal Wisdom and Healing Plants for Wellness

Extreme Health Library Sale is happening for just 10 DAYS. This is your chance to get over 50 e-accessible titles from various bloggers, practitioners, and others who can get you on your way to taking charge of your own health.

These e-books, videos, and others have been carefully selected to appear in this sale by Pat Robinson of Heal Thyself and Amanda Rose of Traditional-Foods.com, who share a similar health philosophy to mine which is that foods have the power to heal and help our bodies overcome not only symptoms but chronic conditions that often take over the lives of many who experience them.
Valued at over $800, this bundle is available for just $39.97 and contains a wealth of health resources for many different uses and needs.

bundle-rectangle-buy-now

 

The versatility of herbs for health

Herbs have been used for thousands and thousands of years by the people of the earth, and are foods that can be applied in tinctures, infusions, topical use, cooking, cleaning, aromatherapy, detox, and much, much more. Here are some great resources for getting started in your herbal journey – all these are available in the bundle sale:

Practical Herbs / Henriette Kress.

We once had a bare garden and a mighty craving for garden greens to add to our soup. “I spy some very green lemon balm” and this herb that grows like a weed substituted in a bean soup for kale. Herbs are food but they tend to have such high levels of antioxidants and other nutrients that research continues to find that herbs do help to relieve specific conditions. If you have ever wondered what herbal remedy to use for a flu or cold, to relieve arthritis pain, or to clear your airways, this collection of products is a one-stop shop. You will even learn how to harvest remedies from trees, taking foraging to a whole new level.

Practical Herbs by herbalist Henriette Kress will help you grow herbs in your own garden, harvest them from the wild, and store them after harvest. You will learn the process for brewing herbal teas, vinegars, syrups, and tinctures and using them to relieve common ailments. Learn how to create a uniformly consistent herbal tincture in your own kitchen and how to use “flopped” herbal vinegars to clean a tough spot in your kitchen or bath. (150 pages; $9.50)

 

Introduction to Tree Medicines / Darcey Blue French.

A perfect complement to any wellness or foraging toolkit. If you are surrounded by pines, cherry, alder, walnut and other trees you will learn a great deal about harvesting leaves, needles, bark, and resins to use to improve respiratory health, digestion, stress and anxiety, and heal wounds. Darcey describes how to harvest and prepare oils, balms, teas and elixirs to integrate into your health regimen. With the perspective that the Earth is a sacred and living being, this 38-page book is a great introduction to trees as medicine. (38 pages; $19.99)

 

Herbal Remedies for Children During the Cold and Flu Season / Rosalee de la Forêt.

Designed to provide you with expert advice on using herbal remedies to get through the cold and flu season. It includes information on fevers, coughs, sore throats, congestion, teething, and more. When do you use elderberry? What about elderflower? How much do you give your children? You will be walked through options for children of all ages (and even adults) in this 88 page book. (88 pages; $20)

 

Mother’s Little Herbal Helper And Home Remedies / Natalie Vickery.

A home herbal toolkit for reducing symptoms of many ailments — cold and flu, headaches, fungal infections, allergies, arthritis, bites, stings, burns, coughs, congestion, and more. How many times have you wished you could just make it through allergy season or an arthritis flare up with far less suffering? This is where herbal remedies shine. Natalie will introduce you to the different ways to prepare herbs and the types of herbs you use to remedy common ailments. Read it closely and build the custom herbal toolkit you need for your own household. (116 pages; $12.50)

 

Of Thorn and Petal: The Remedy in the Rose /  Kiva Rose.

50 pages of monographs, recipes, case studies etc., focused around Rosa spp. Kiva explains the healing properties of the rose. The anti-inflammatory benefits of wild rose have been forgotten by our Western minds. However, traditional herbalists know that wild rose can soothe burns, infections, and pain quickly. Kiva teaches how to use roses, from petals to leaves to rose hips. For instance, rose hips, rich with phytonutrients and anti-oxidants, are a tonic for weak kidneys and adrenals. Kiva’s book covers a myriad of digestive disorders which can be supported with traditional rose medicines. Oils, vinegars, and poultices of rose and their uses are explained. Meet the rose, which brings calm and balance, through recipes, instructions and photos. (50 pages; $9.99)

 

Listen to the Ancient Mother Wisdom by Kimberly Crail.

Wise Woman herbalist and educator, Kimberly Cedar Cat, shares Listen to the Ancient Mother Wisdom – Universal Healthcare Brought To You By … The Universe! Learn the language of plants, healing with the “Green Elixir Sisters”, and advice for cold & flu prevention. Cedar Cat’s book teaches you the 5 herbs that can revitalize your life when used on a daily basis and can resolve most health problems You will be empowered to use herbal allies which are not complicated or expensive.

(23 pages; $10)

 

Numen: The Healing Power of Plants / A Resource Guide

Have you wanted to learn to make your own herbal medicines? Numen: The Healing Power of Plants – A Resource Guide was contributed by community herbalists to promote the amazing power of plants to heal. This 37-page ebook covers harvesting herbs to medicine-making, and suggests remedies to have on hand. Fevers, digestion, anxiety, depression, and creating an herbal first aid kit are discussed. How to make medicinal teas, tinctures, infused oils, and salves are explained. Dosing charts, recommended books, gardening resources, and bulk suppliers are included in this information-packed introduction to the documentary film Numen.

(37 pages; $12)
 

Click here for more information about the Extreme Health Library Sale, 10 days, 50+titles about healing and natural health and wellness.

Ends Thursday, March 7th at midnight PST.

GAPS Healthy Fats Real Food

Why a High-Protein Diet Won’t Make You Healthier

www.mypicshares.com

Due to the insistence of conventional health communities that fats and cholesterol should be avoided, high-protein diets have been all the rage for a number of years.

The Atkins Diet was popular for many years and received much press and attention since it came out in the late 1950s. Many people claimed to lose a lot of weight on this diet. Depending on who you asked, this diet was heralded by some as a low-fat diet, high-protein diet and by others as a high fat diet.

This quote by Dr. Atkins himself describes the diet:

“Those of you who read my first book, Dr. Atkins’ Diet Revolution, know what diet to follow — there was only one. Millions of dieters simply called it the Atkins Diet. It was a very low carbohydrate reducing diet (not a high-fat diet, as many of my nonreading critics asserted).”

The South Beach Diet came out during the 2000s and it affected more dieters than just about any diet during that decade. The major flaw with most of these types of diets was they didn’t emphasize something of great importance: healthy fats – which are so critical for health. As a result, many people who followed the Atkins Diet gained the weight back after losing it.

It may seem counter-intuitive that eating fat and cholesterol can be good for health, but this myth about fat and cholesterol being bad for us has no grounded science behind it.

You can see clear evidence of bad science being used everywhere. A good example is the USDA Dietary Guideline recommendations such as MyPlate, featuring a diagram of 5 food groups: fruits, vegetables, grains, protein, and dairy. But fat is nowhere to be found.

And yet, fat is one of the most critical foods we could eat for health since it’s one of our best sources of Vitamins A, D, E, and K2 – essential fat soluble vitamins, Omega 3s, CLA (conjugated linoleic acid), and other important nutrients like folate, B12, iron, and zinc.

Fat and cholesterol are essential for a wide range of bodily functions:

  • Necessary for the production of hormones in the body.
  • Brain and nervous system function (a majority of our brains are composed of fat)
  • The foundation of cell integrity
  • Digestion and normalization of blood sugar levels
  • Regulation of body temperature
  • Protecting internal organs from damage
  • Providing energy
  • Maintaining proper weight and metabolism levels

Dr. Weston A. Price learned in his world travels by visiting 14 various countries that all healthy populations who were free of disease consumed much more of these nutrients from animal foods – sometimes up to TEN times the amount we currently consume in our modern culture.

Truth be told, avoiding fat and cholesterol is disastrous for health.  A number of medical doctors are now admitting this openly to the public.

When you stop and think about our modern health guidelines which recommend avoiding fat – have these really helped our population become healthier or lose weight? Not at all. According to recent reports, in fact, we are continuing to get fatter and sicker with each passing year.

What’s wrong with lean meats?

Lean meats are very hard-to-digest. Since they lack fat-soluble vitamins such as A and D, they end up becoming putrified in our digestive systems and cause chronic pathogenic bacteria in our guts which spreads to all parts of our bodies. This leads to many other health issues including weight problems, auto-immune disease, food allergies, bone and joint issues, and others.

Even a lot of grassfed meats tend to be short on fat.  If you are coming off a low-fat diet you will probably need some help getting your digestion back in order to be able to handle fats. Starting out slowly with well-cooked meats, poultry, fish, and other animal fats in broths and soups, with vegetables and plenty of healthy fats like butter or ghee, lard, or tallow. These are very healing and can help you to be able to to properly digest your food.

So eat your meats with plenty of fat:

  • olive oil
  • butter
  • ghee
  • coconut oil
  • fat drippings from lard (pork fat), schmaltz (chicken fat) or tallow (beef fat or suet)

and also with gelatin-rich broths or cooked in broth made from the bones of animals and birds on pasture.

The GAPS protocol by Dr. Natasha Campbell McBride may be a good healing and detox if you have digestive issues and want to heal so you can properly digest foods again. You may also need digestive enzymes or hydrochloric acid. The best brand of enzymes I’ve found is Enzyme Formulations, and you need a practitioner to obtain them. Houston Enzymes are also a quality product that I’ve heard many good things about from clients and others. They have customer support to help you determine which are right for you.

What’s wrong with protein powders?

Protein powders are a popular food product that many people buy because they don’t have time to prepare something real. Slick marketing and labeling has convinced consumers these are healthy products to consume. But, these powders are processed through high heat temperatures which denatures the protein. Processing actually turns those substances into something harmful – a free-glutamate (think MSG).

www.mypicshares.com

Plus, protein powders almost always contain a bunch of synthetic nutrients, stabilizers, preservatives, and other things you can’t even pronounce or comprehend what they are. Even the supposedly high-quality whey protein powders that are healthy, containing organic grassfed whey from healthy cows, like this one – Whole Whey Natural from Metaorganics

  • Whey protein concentrate from grassfed cows’ raw milk (pesticide free, no added hormones)
  • Fibersol (what?)
  • Arabinogalactin extract (what?)
  • Nonfat milk powder (no thanks, I’ll take real full fats that aren’t oxidized)
  • Lecithin (soy, no thanks)
  • Medium chain triglycerides (which you can get from real coconut oil)
  • Natural flavors (MSG)
  • Guar gum (MSG)
  • Lohan (what the heck is that?)

Okay, whole whey protein from grass fed cows’ milk, that’s the only thing I’d even consider consuming on this list.    But I could get that from having a smoothie with yogurt and kefir in it, or drinking a glass of milk, or eating some cheese.

Even if you knew what the other ingredients were, do you need to be consuming them? Probably not. So everything else? I’d avoid like the plague and just eat real food.

This product is a great example of how just because something is labeled organic or even grassfed, does not make it healthy to consume.

But aren’t plant protein powders better?

There are other protein powder products not sourced from animals using proteins from plants, grains, and seeds. No matter how the labels might describe them as being low-temperature processed or non-denatured, these products are still as unnatural as can be, and we should not rely on grains or plants in those amounts as a good source of protein. Our ancestors never did this. Again, there is no fat present in these products as the proteins are isolated and compounded many times above what would occur in nature.

Vegetables, grains, seeds, and legumes contain phytic acid – an anti-nutrient that can leach minerals from the stores in your body – usually the bones. To neutralize these components, sprouting/soaking, fermentation, cooking, and serving with healthy fats is required. When those techniques are applied, your body can use the nutrients in those foods. But eating in raw form, or in the case of grains simply cooked, or highly processed and compounded many times as protein powders is not a smart way to consume these foods.

You’re better off eating a nice pile of chopped up broccoli and carrots, cooked in a pan with butter, salt, garlic, and some seasoning than you are to consume plant protein powders. You’ll absorb the nutrients in the plants better since you’ll be eating it with a wonderful, healthy fat with fat-soluble vitamins (A&D), and it will actually taste good.

Protein and fat work together

There’s absolutely nothing wrong with protein – provided it’s a natural source of protein and it’s also accompanied by some type of natural fat such as in meats or animal products. Even some other foods such as grains, vegetables, legumes, and nuts contain a small amount of protein (although not much except for in the case of nuts). But the point is, those foods with small amounts of protein don’t have much naturally-occurring fat.

That’s why it’s important to traditionally prepare grains, seeds, legumes, and vegetables – either through fermentation or soaking/sprouting and/or cooking to neutralize phytic acid, and eat with healthy animal fats. Those fat-soluble nutrients help us to absorb the nutrients in those foods.

The lack of fat in high-protein foods like industrially-produced lean meats and processed foods like protein powders is a problem because they lack vital, fat-soluble nutrients. In this case, Vitamin A.  The body stores Vitamin A in the liver. If you keep eating high-protein foods with no fat, you will soon deplete Vitamin A stores in the body.  This leads to many chronic issues including:

  • bone issues and osteoporosis from loss of calcium
  • Heart or kidney disease
  • Thyroid and hormonal imbalances
  • Auto-immune disease such as fibroymyalgia (chronic fatigue) or more serious issues including diabetes

All of these issues sum up much of what is wrong with our population’s modern health profile – some of the most common diseases people have, and they are on the increase. As a coincidence, many people avoid fat, count calories, and cling to nutrient-deficient diets.  Quite an interesting connection, isn’t it?

What’s wrong with modern diets?

The Standard American Diet is sorely depleted of nutrient-dense foods. Besides chemicals and toxins in our diets from processed foods that make up so much of what we eat, three ingredients that have remained a constant in our everyday eating habits are white flour, sugar, and vegetable oils.

Dr. Weston A. Price discovered that fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K2 were present in the diets of healthy populations he studied all over the world. Modern diets are lacking in these nutrients, including Vitamin A, a nutrient we can get from foods such as cod liver oil, liver, butter, cream, fish, and fish eggs.

We have an abundance of lean protein foods in our diets because conventional medical information tells us to eliminate fat and cholesterol. Lean meats are NOT natural in any sense of the word, and the majority of them are produced on CAFOs (concentrated animal feeding operations) where animals do not receive a natural diet nor live in a natural environment. This makes the meat and fat content of these foods off-balance and not healthy for our bodies. For example, due to the way they are produced, CAFO meats are too high in Omega 6s, and the ratio of Omega 6 to Omega 3s is about 15:1 or wider. Grassfed meats are the correct balance at approximately 3:1.

For thousands and thousands of years, healthy meat and poultry was eaten by people around the world with fat, skin, bones, and everything else that goes with animal foods. Those were not separated out, they were considered essential and necessary for maintaining good health.

Instead of processed foods or protein powders that have isolated, high amounts of denatured protein and lack other important co-factors and nutrients, eat healthy foods with saturated fats and real nutrients like egg yolks from pastured hens, raw yogurt, milk, or other dairy food, coconut oil, mashed up avocadoes to soups, broths, stews, and or smoothies. Eat fatty cuts of grassfed meats, pork, lamb, poultry and game meats with plenty of butter, olive oil, or other animal fat and with or cooked in bone broths. Cook your vegetables and braise your meats in butter, lard, tallow, or ghee. For desert, have a big bowl of home-made full-fat raw yogurt with fruit, nuts, and cinnamon.

Here’s a recipe for home-made whey on the Radiant Life site, which is an excellent natural source of real protein. You can also easily make a home-made protein powder such as the recipe featured in Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon.

These foods are delicious and good for you, and will bring back flavor to the bland, boring processed foods you’ve been eating that aren’t healthy. Instead of high-protein and low-fat, make your meals high-protein and high fat too.

Want more information?

The importance of dietary fats

What’s the real scoop on red meat and higher mortality rates?

Which is better for your health – polyunsaturated or saturated fats?

Dr. Sinatra and others speaking out – cholesterol is not the cause of heart disease