Tag Archives: real food

Green Living Guest Posts Probiotics Real Food Reviews

Getting Started with Fermented Foods, With Wardee Harmon

fermentedsoda
I’d like to share an introduction to my good friend Wardee Harmon’s e-book Lacto-Fermentation. Wardee is a wonderful and passionate educator and blogger on the subject of fermentation as well as other real food and natural health topics.
 

If you are new to fermenting, you’ll discover a bit about the benefits of fermented foods, why you might want to make them yourself rather than buy at the store, and get some inspiration for doing your own preparation.
 

Lacto-Fermentation is a companion ebook to the online Lacto-Fermentation ecourse on her blog GNOWFLGINS. In this book you’ll learn to make sauerkraut, condiments, preserves, relishes, pickles, kvass, kombucha, and much more. 
 

Her other book The Idiot’s Guide to Fermenting Foods is already on my shelf and I am thrilled to have this one in my collection as well.
 

Some years ago when I first started fermenting, I was pretty intimidated.  But as I discovered, the process is not difficult. And once you get going, it’s really fun.   I always feel motivated by the fact that I know the fermented foods I make are not only delicious but also have increased nutrient value over just eating those same foods raw or cooked. Now I can’t imagine my life without these probiotic-rich foods; including them in my daily diet has improved my health in ways I never knew possible.
 
I would have loved to get my hands on a great book like this with which to begin my journey into fermenting. Wardee definitely makes learning how to ferment fun and easy, something any beginner will appreciate.  
 

Wardee’s book Lacto-Fermentation is one of  the many superb offerings in the Extreme Health Digital Library, with 50+ health & wellness titles – e-books, videos, white papers, and more with a value of over $800…available for just $39.97 (each title costs just .75 cents each) all day today, March 7th until midnight at 12 a.m. PST.

 

What are fermented foods?

I heard recently that “ferment” would be the health buzz word of 2013.
 

The word ferment, when you use it together with food, can be a little scary for some people. The ick factor is high. But the good news is, this is lessening as more and more people become aware of the health benefits of fermented foods and become accustomed to the complex, sweet-sour-salty taste.
 

I’m happy to be a guest here today. Raine’s a good friend and she asked me to talk about the benefits of fermented foods, the advantages of making them yourself, and also give you some encouragement and tips for getting started. So that’s what I’m going to do.
 

First, what’s so great about fermented foods? Get ready! They’re really, really awesome.

Wait: I think I’d better explain what’s happening when a food is fermented. I’m talking about a particular type of fermentation — lacto-fermentation. What’s happening is that beneficial organisms, called lactobacilli, are encouraged to eat the food and proliferate throughout the food (this process is also called culturing). While they’re eating, they’re producing an acid that effectively preserves and protects the food form spoiling. Also they’re making the food better for us.
 

Here’s where the benefits come in.

Fermented foods experience a nutrition boost. Minerals are more readily absorbed, vitamin and enzyme content increases, the beneficial acid (lactic acid) aids in digestion and overall health, beneficial organisms re-populate the gut to increase the health of our immune system and overall health, and foods get pre-digested, making them more digestible for us. It really is a miraculous and highly beneficial process!
 

So, next question. Why would someone (namely, you) want to go to all the trouble of making fermented foods yourself?

Keep in mind, you certainly don’t have to make them yourself to get the benefits. There are merchants making high-quality fermented foods and you can find them in the cooler of your health food store or health food department — Kombucha, kvass, sauerkraut, old-fashioned pickled, cheese… These foods are really delicious and I love supporting these companies when I can’t make something myself.
 
But when you make them yourself, you’ll save money — all those bottles of Kombucha add up! Also, you can tweak flavors to get unique results and tastes all your own. Or perhaps you’ve just got gobs of garden produce to put up. Well, fermenting is a whole lot easier than canning, because the fermenting organisms do all the “cooking” while you sit back and wait for their work to be done. Plus, fermenting is more nutritious than canning. (You do need cold storage, like a cellar, to keep fermented foods long term. If you don’t have a cellar, certainly consider fermenting on an as-needed basis.)
 

Now let me encourage you to get started.

A lot of people think that if they don’t like sauerkraut, they won’t like other fermented foods. This is simply not true. So many foods can be fermented, and with so many different end flavors, that I’m pretty sure every person can find a fermented food to like. My eBook, Lacto-Fermentation, shares recipes to ferment practically every food group. You’ll create kefir and yogurt and real sour cream, cheese, sourdough bread, probiotic ice cream, pickles, chutneys, relish, salsa, beverages, and even pickled meats.
 
For the person who is particularly wary of sour foods, I’d recommend venturing into the world of fermented foods with one of these more mild ferment recipes (found on my blog): fruit chutney, fermented guacamole (video included), fermented ketchup, or fermented cranberry-apple-orange relish, just to name a few. Each of these recipes uses simple, real and whole food ingredients, and no special equipment other than jars or crocks — and a little time for the organisms to do their thing.
 
Doesn’t sound so hard, does it? And it sounds delicious, right? So get out there and get fermenting!

————————————————————————-

I’d like to thank Wardee for kindly providing a great introduction to fermented foods. Now, aren’t you a little more motivated to learn more about these beneficial foods and get healthier?  :)
 

To purchase this book…

plus, all 50+ great health and wellness titles available in this bundle, click here Extreme Health Library Sale  for more information.
 

Hurry! This is the last day for this amazing sale, which ends tonight, March 7th at midnight PST.

Activism Healthy Living Healthy Meat Kids & Family Kids & Junk Food Real Food Recipes

10 Ways to Kiss Processed Foods Goodbye and Get More Nutrition in Your Diet

 

processedkidsfood

We all need more nutrition in our diets – especially if you eat a lot of processed foods.

Processed foods are full of chemicals, preservatives, dyes, fake fats, and other harmful ingredients. And, packaged foods tend to have less nutrients due to the way they are produced, leaving you feeling hungry and unsatisfied soon afterward. You might even feel stomach cramping, have gas or diarrhea, and just feel rotten.

And guess what? Those are NOT normal!!!

Due to chemicals and engineering, processed foods can also alter your body’s tastes and desires, and make you crave more of what’s bad for you.

So you get stuck in a loop of eating processed foods. You are unmotivated, feel as though you don’t have enough time to cook. Maybe preparing real food from scratch seems too difficult and cost prohibitive.  And yet, the more you eat those foods, the worse you feel and the less energy you have.

Something’s gotta give.
 

Enter real, nutrient-dense foods

When food is grown in nutrient-rich soil and without chemicals, pesticides, hormones, antibiotics, and GMOs, which do have a negative impact on our health. Nutrient-content is always higher, and nutrients support health.
 

The result? You have more energy, less health issues, and you just feel better.
 
Here are 10 books that can help you improve the quality of your diet, with information about how to find, prepare, and entice you to improve the way you eat, achieve your goal of getting more nutrition out of your meals – and fit within your budget.
 
These authors have done the research and homework so you don’t have to…it’s easier than you think!
 
All these great books and 40+ others are included in the Extreme Health Library bundle being offered at a great price through MARCH 7th.
 

Thrifty Food Plan Experience / Millie Copper


 
Good health and good-eating can feel expensive but in Thrifty Food Plan Experience Millie Copper provides in-depth support in feeding a family of five on $172 per week, from a Weston A. Price Foundation dietary perspective. She provides 67 pages of thoughts, tips, and ideas plus a 2 week menu plan, over 40 recipes (and links to many more) to help you succeed.
 
(67 pages; PDF format; $8.95)
 

Off The Shelf / Kris Bordessa


Off The Shelf by Kris Bordessa gives you the tools to replace store-bought condiments, toppings, and snacks with healthier homemade alternatives. Complementing our products on giving up processed foods, these simple and beautiful recipes will allow you to say goodbye to food additives forever.
 
(43 pages; PDF format; $7)
 

100 Days of Real Food Challenge / Lisa Leake

A family with 2 young children in Charlotte, NC took a 100 Days of Real Food pledge. They didn’t eat a single ounce of processed food or refined ingredients for 100 days in the hopes that they would inspire people to follow suit. If you are new to a diet of unprocessed food, prepare to be inspired. Lisa Leake and the team at 100 Days of Real Food offer you meal plans, recipes, and tips to help you in your journey. They provide a quick guide to real food shopping as a bonus in this offer and have extensive free resources on their website for you to explore.
 
(73 pages PDF format; Bonus)

 

The Savvy Shopper’s Guide to Sustainable Food / Raine Saunders


 
Learn how to source health foods from sustainable sources, whether it is from local farms and farmer’s markets in your area, online merchants, delivery services, local grocery, or health food stores.
 
Learn to read labels, what to look for, what to avoid, and how to select and buy the best foods available for better health. Learn more about why supporting the sustainable food system is so important – and how it really can keep you healthy and feed the world.
(139 pages; PDF format; $24)

 

Nourishing Our Children

If you’ve heard of the dietary perspective of the Weston Price Foundation and wondered what it is all about, Nourishing Our Children: Timeless Principles For Supporting Learning, Behavior, and Health Through Optimal Nutrition from the San Francisco chapter spells out its philosophy in a beautiful and easy-to-read format.

The e-book provides dietary principles for parents to follow before and after conception, as well as recommendations on how to nourish rather than merely feed their children. It also covers the problems associated with modern processed foods and vital information about water and fluoride, traditional fats and oils, milk, soy, vital nutrients, and healthy meal preparation.

 

(97 pages; PDF format; $20)
 

Broth: Elixir Of Life / Patricia Lacoss-Arnold.

Our ancestors made use of every part of the animal to nourish them, including the bones. Bones are rich in calcium and other minerals; bones contain collagen which brings elasticity to the skin; bones are rich in gelatin which aids in digestion. Using bones to make broth is a key strategy to extract bone nutrients and add them to your diet.

Patricia Lacoss-Arnold in Broth: Elixir of Life will describe how to make and use broth in your every day cooking. If you have ever wonder how to make broth from beef, chicken, fish or even rabbit bones, you will soon learn about the flavors of these different options.
 
(59 pages; PDF format; $8.99)
 

Eat More Leafy Greens / Cynthia Lair.

How do you choose, chop, and cook your greens? What greens are best in a raw salad? If you are new to greens, Cynthia Lair in Eat More Leafy Greens provides you with an excellent orientation for getting started.
 
How do you know if a particular green is best eat cooked or raw? Check the list of greens in this 20-page guide or use one simple tip that Cynthia will teach you.
 
(20 pages; PDF format; $6.99)
 

Rebuild from Depression: A Nutrient Guide / Amanda Rose, Ph.D. and Annell Mavrantonis, M.D.


 
Rebuild from Depression: A Nutrient Guide, Including Depression in Pregnancy and Postpartum identifies seven nutrients most commonly associated with depression in the medical literature, including Omega 3 in fish oil, B vitamins, vitamin D, iron, magnesium, and zinc. They provide readers with tools to: (1) Identify a nutrient deficiency, (2) Locate the best supplements / vitamins for depression, and (3) Select and prepare foods to maximize those nutrients in their diets.
 
The ebook opens with Rose’s biography of depression and psychosis. She makes a compelling claim: My grandmother died at the age of sixty-one from complications of postpartum depression. Rose argues that her grandmother showed signs of nutrient deficiencies in her twenties, did not correct them, and suffered a life of depression, diabetes, and heart disease, all of which share a common nutrient deficiency: Omega 3 fatty acids.
 
(200 pages; PDF format; $19.97)
 

Divine Dinners: Gluten-Free, Nourishing, Family-Friendly Meals / Lydia Joy Shatney


 
Lydia Joy Shatney offers Divine Dinners: Gluten-Free, Nourishing, Family-Friendly Meals complete with 75 recipes to help you create menus full of wonderful, gluten-free dinners. With meat-based entrees and a collection of side dishes, soups, sauces, dips, and spreads, you will spend weeks cooking through this cookbook.
 
(104 pages; PDF format; $14.95)
 

The Five Flavors of Food /Lisa Mase

Lisa Mase of Harmonized Cookery shares “The Five Flavors of Food: Combining Ingredients Into Harmonious Meals.” To satisfy the whole being, Traditional Chinese Medicine encourages including five flavors in each meal: sweet, sour, salty, pungent, and bitter. The five flavors correspond to the five elements: Earth, Wood, Water, Metal and Fire. Planning menus that incorporate these elements and flavors, we can start to recognize which foods help us harmonize with our environment and the seasons.
 
(4 pages; PDF format; Bonus)
 

To buy these and all the other great health titles in this bundle, click here to visit the Extreme Health Library page for more information.

Ends Thursday March 7th at midnight, PST.