Tag Archives: sea salt

Healthy Living Real Food

13 Ways to Increase Mineral Intake for Improved Well-Being & Health

www.mypicshares.com
It is said that all health begins and ends in the digestive tract. It is also said that many diseases are caused by a lack of vital nutrients in our diets.

If our digestive tracts are not functioning properly, we can’t digest the nutrients from the foods we eat, including essential minerals needed for health.

Minerals are critical to almost every function in our bodies, and the lack thereof can cause many symptoms people believe are “normal” or may even ignore because they get too busy to deal with the problem. Some of these include loss of appetite, fatigue, headache, muscle tension, anxiety, nausea, inability to focus or irritability.

We are more mineral depleted than people living just 100 years ago due to the increased population and prevalence of mechanized, commercial, and industrial farming methods. Chemical processes remove quality and quantity of the nutrients found in our soils, the source of life.

These farming methods may produce bigger quantities of food, but the quality and nutritional value of foods overall has diminished greatly. When you eat conventional and processed foods, you are eating dead foods with many of the nutrients including vitamins, minerals, enzymes, co-factors, and beneficial bacteria removed and then synthetic versions of vitamins and minerals are added back in. These synthetic versions are not something our bodies recognize and they can actually cause  issues such as overdosing and storage of toxins in our bodies that can lead to chronic health disorders.

Most diseases and health conditions can be improved or eliminated by making sure you get enough nutrients – and in particular – minerals in your diet.

If you’re looking to increase minerals in your diet naturally, you can eliminate or improve many health issues including weight issues, insomnia, mood and behavior disorders, adrenal fatigue, inability to deal with stress, ability to focus, increased levels of energy and wellness, and many more.

I have had health issues for years that were greatly improved and eliminated with careful attention to mineral-rich, real food sources. Read my post on how GAPS helped me with panic, anxiety, and insomnia when nothing else I tried for nearly 20 years did.

Some of the most digestible foods that are high in minerals include liquid foods.  These foods are easily absorbed by those with digestive compromise (which includes most everyone). Most people are affected by this issue due to poor lifestyle and dietary habits that have been maintained for longer than a short period of time.

Here’s a list of some of my favorite foods for increasing mineral intake:

  1. Nettles – calcium, magnesium, potassium, selenium, zinc. This is one of the easiest ways to increase your mineral intake, and can be made in about 5 minutes. I make nettles every day, and my whole family drinks them. According to Susun Weed, stinging nettles “strengthens adrenal functioning, promotes sound sleep, increases overall energy, prevents allergic reactions, strengthens the blood vessels, and prevents hair loss.”
  2. Bone broths - zinc, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and others and will vary on the source of the bones you are using. Minerals are not heat sensitive and will transfer into your broth while cooking. Bone broths support digestion, immunity, help eliminate cellulite, promote sound sleep, nourishes skin, tendons, joints, ligaments, bones, and mucous membranes. Donna Gates of Body Ecology agrees that bone broths are one of the foundations of health and that they support digestion, immunity, help eliminate cellulite, promote sound sleep, nourishes skin, tendons, joints, ligaments, bones, and mucous membranes.
  3. Sea salt – calcium, magnesium, manganese, copper, iron, boron, and many trace minerals. Drink in water daily or add to just about any food or other beverage you consume. Salt is absolutely vital to health, and despite what conventional health “experts” say, it supports many components of our health such as vascular, sinus, reproductive and sexual health, promotes healthy ph in our cells (especially brain cells), digestion and absorption of food in the small intestine, bones and muscles, hydroelectric energy in the body, adrenal glands which regulate over 50 bodily functions, regulation of metabolic processes and sleep.  Refined salt, full of caking agents and color agents, and which is stripped of vital trace minerals to leave mostly sodium chloride, a deadly poison to the body. Refined salt is what you’ll find in restaurants and grocery stores, but it’s the substance that should be getting the blame for health problems such as high blood pressure, heart disease, edema, allergic reactions, and many others.
  4. Kelp – calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, iodine, and many trace minerals such as copper, boron, and selenium. Use powdered or dried kelp in soups, stews, smoothies. You can also sprinkle it on any other foods like casseroles or main dishes. Promotes brain and mental function, supports thyroid and endocrine health, relieves anxiety and nervous energy, boosts energy for daily tasks, and promotes sleep.
  5. Fermented and cultured foods - home-made yogurt, buttermilk, sour cream and other dairy foods, kombucha, dairy and water kefir, kvass, cultured vegetables, fruits, meats, depending on the strains of probiotics or friendly bacteria present in the fermented foods you eat, you will also experience an increase in the nutrients present including a wide variety of minerals. (Vitamin Profiles of Kefirs Made from Milk of Different Species. International Journal of Food Science & Technology. 1991. Kneifel et al). Health benefits: reduces the risk of cancer, supports cardiovascular health, digestion, immunity, brain function, bones and joints, and
  6. Pastured meats and poultry, and especially organ meats - magnesium, zinc, copper, phosphorus, selenium, and iodine depending on where the animals/birds graze or forage.
  7. Pastured dairy - raw milk and other dairy foods like cream, butter, cheese, sour cream, yogurt, and kefir, contain 3-5 times the amount of minerals found in factory farm/feedlot milk. Rich in colloidal minerals calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, and sometimes iodine depending on the source of minerals found in the soil where the cows you get milk from graze.
  8. Fish and other seafood from safe sources - magnesium, potassium, iron, zinc, copper, manganese, selenium. Seafood is one of the most rich sources of minerals to be found.
  9. Organic fruits and vegetables – calcium, copper, magnesium, iron, phosphorus, potassium, selenium, sodium, zinc, (best eaten with healthy fats like cream, butter, olive oil, coconut oil, or fermented or cultured).
  10. Magnesium oil - we absorb nutrients through our skin even more efficiently than our digestive tracts, and when our digestive tracts are compromised, absorbing through the skin is a good alternative to consuming foods we may not be able to digest well.
  11. Epsom salt baths – my favorite brand is Remarkable Redwood Remedies. This salt is high in magnesium chloride and is ideal for transdermal absorption (via the skin). Good source of magnesium and other trace minerals.
  12. Filtered water with minerals - tap water (and likely bottled water) is contaminated with PCBs, lead, chlorine, fluoride, and other harmful chemicals. If you can find a good source of mineral water, this is another important source of minerals in the diet. If you can’t find a good source of mineral water, consider a water filter. We use Berkey Filters and love them. These filters do remove chlorine and other harmful contaminants, but not fluoride.
  13. Liquid minerals – if you are still not getting enough minerals in your diet, you may consider a good brand of liquid minerals. Honestly, I’ve used many brands of minerals and not found anything better than Dr. Morter’s Best Process Trace Minerals. I always list any supplement as a last choice because it’s best to get minerals and other nutrients from real food. Since many people are grossly deficient in these elements due to compromised health issues and lack of minerals in the soil and food we eat today. These can easily be added to drinking water, soups, stews, smoothies, juice, or kombucha and other beverages or foods.

 

Green Living Guest Posts Healthy Living Real Food

Changing Ingredients For A Nutrient-Dense Diet

www.mypicshares.com

Are you thinking about making changes in your dietary choices that are more traditional and nutrient-dense? This process can seem daunting, even to the most experienced cook. But making those changes can cause a huge impact on your health – in ways you might never imagine.

It may seem like too much to go into your pantry, throw everything out, and start from scratch. But, just by making a few simple changes – like switching from rancid, genetically-modified, artificial fats such as shortening and canola oil to healthy fats like butter and tallow, you can lose that extra 20 pounds you’ve been fighting for the last decade, or perhaps reduce the amount of colds and flus you catch each year. The possibilities are endless!

I want to thank Marilyn Moll from from The Urban Homemaker for allowing me to post this great list of getting-started ideas in your kitchen from her site. It provides some basic ideas about how to change out some of the not-so-healthy ingredients in your kitchen for those that are healthier and better for your body.

Making changes from processed foods to natural, nourishing foods does more than just satisfy our bodies. It also provides us with a sense of satisfaction about preparing foods from scratch for our families, supports our local farmers and food growers and our own communities, secures sustainable and humane farming practices for the future, and keeps our environment clean by not putting our dollars toward companies that pollute our health, water, soil, and air.

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If you have decided to transition over to a more nutrient-dense diet based on Nourishing Traditions or Eat Fat Lose Fat, you may feel a bit overwhelmed. This post will summarize ingredient changes to make existing recipes in your kitchen more NT (Nourishing Traditions) friendly.

Ingredient changes:

Replace commercial baked goods such as bread, biscuits, muffins, crackers, tortillas, and others, with: breads, biscuits, muffins, pancakes, etc prepared using fresh whole grain flours which use the Two-Stage Process. If you do not have a grain mill, many batters can be prepared with whole grains using a blender.  Locate additional recipes for baked goods here.

Replace any refined sugar with: Rapadura, sucanat, muscovado, raw honey, maple syrup, or Stevia (use the green variety, not white powder or the liquid).

Replace white flour with: freshly milled (if possible) whole wheat flour, spelt or kamut flour, sprouted whole grain flour, or other freshly milled flours. Flours that are not sprouted can be soaked overnight in 2 tbsps whey, apple cider vinegar, or lemon juice.

Replace water and bullion cubes or canned stock with: Home-made chicken or beef stock.

Replace shortening/other artificial fats with: virgin coconut oil or palm oil, or butter from grass-fed cows (or raw butter, if available).

Replace canned cream of chicken, cream of mushroom, and other creamed soups with: homemade white sauce, add your own flavorings. Recipe: 2 tbsp olive oil, 2 tbsp whole wheat sprouted flour, and 1 cup stock. Multiply this out for the number of cups you need for healthy and tasty homemade cream of chicken soup.

Replace vegetable oils such as canola oil or corn oil with: coconut oil or butter, olive oil or Mary’s Oil Blend, written about in Eat Fat Lose Fat (equal amounts of coconut oil, extra virgin olive oil, and sesame oil). Use a variety of healthy fats for good balance of essential fatty acids.

Replace canned fruit in syrup with:  fresh or frozen fruit w/a little honey and enough added fluid to make the recipe

Replace skim, 1% or 2% milk with: raw milk or coconut milk

Replace flavored yogurt with: raw milk or whole milk yogurt.  Add real fruit or 1-2 tbsp all-fruit preserves to sweeten.

Replace dry milk with: coconut milk powder

Replace constarch with: arrowroot powder

Replace canned beans with: dry beans that have been soaked overnight in water with vinegar added. Drain in the morning. Then add fresh filtered water to cover, bring to a boil, and simmer until softened. Drain. Add to your soup or stock and cook 4-8 hours.

Replace soy, rice, or nut milks with: Raw milk from cow or goat

Replace refined table salt with: Real Salt or sea salt (minerals should be visible in the salt)

Replace sodas and juice with: carbonated water, Nourishing Traditions ginger ale, kvass, kefir soda or other fermented drinks. See Nourishing Traditions for more information.

Replace commercial cheese with: raw milk cheese whenever possible.

Replace commercial mayo and salad dressings with: homemade dressings and mayo from NT’s recipes or use good quality mayo or good quality dressings that contain no soy, cottonseed, or canola oil. Try Wilderness Family Naturals mayonnaise.

Replace pasta with: spaghetti squash or brown rice pasta, or other whole grain alternatives which have been soaked or sprouted, or long-fermented.

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The Urban Homemaker is a family run business dedicated to teaching and promoting “old fashioned skills for contemporary people”. UH offers back-to-basics products for physical and spiritual family health. They believe the products and skills offered promote a more healthful diet, the virtues of thrift and self-sufficiency, and enable homemakers to fulfill the Biblical mandate to be keepers of the home in the spirit of Titus.

When making changes to ingredients in your kitchen, unless you are ready, don’t feel like you need to do everything on this list at once. Pick three items and focus on those for one or two weeks, then pick three more.

Make a list of the things you’ve changed and each week and add to it. At the end of two months, look back through your list and notice what you’ve changed and which of those you’ve committed to and what difference, if any, it has made in your health.

In the near future, I’ll be posting more about how to make changes in your kitchen and health that will bring noticeable change to your life.  Until then, here are some other posts you might find useful:

Breakfast makeovers – you really can rise and shine!

Food budgets – using creativity and prioritizing for healthy eating

Waste not want not: tips for saving in the kitchen

This post is part of Simple Lives Thursday, hosted this week by A Little Bit of Spain in Iowa.