Tag Archives: budget

Activism Healthy Living Healthy Meat Real Food

Real Food Money Saving Tips: Chicken Thighs and Drumsticks for Stock

www.mypicshares.com

Want to make chicken stock but don’t think you can afford good quality chicken? Buy chicken thighs (bone-in) and drumsticks. These pieces are quite inexpensive. Conventional health tells us to avoid dark and red meat. So over the last few decades, meat producers in the U.S. have put a premium on white meat – which is actually the least healthful. Dark meat is actually better for you to eat because it contains more of those all important nutrients found in poultry (see below). If you can get your hands on chicken organ meats, those are also cheap, and extremely nutrient-dense to use in soups, stews, casseroles, and any other dish which has a lot of ingredients in it (think hiding the organ meats in these meals).

Once you have let your bones soak for an hour or so in filtered water with a splash of apple cider vinegar, add in all your other ingredients: butter or ghee, onions, carrots, celery, salt, pepper, and any seasonings you like. I frequently use any combination of the following: parsley, thyme, sage, marjoram, oregano, or basil. Here’s a post about making bone broth.

If you are feeling adventurous, find a farmer who will give you or sell you some chicken feet. Yes, chicken feet. These are incredibly cheap and fantastically abundant in minerals, amino acids, gelatin, and collagen – which helps your whole body and especially your skin, eyes, and bones.  You can add these into any chicken stock after cleaning them and clipping off the nails. Some people don’t clip them off, but I do since toxins can collect in them (such as arsenic).

Is all chicken created equal?

Unfortunately, no. You will get the most nutrition from chickens (or any poultry) raised on pasture, without antibiotics or feeds which alter their nutritional composition such as corn, and grain (and are likely to be sourced from GMO – genetically modified organisms). You are also going to get 3-5 times the amount of nutrients like CLA (conjugated linoleic acid), Omega 3 essential fatty acids, and fat soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K.  Read this informative article from Eat Wild to learn more about the benefits of grass-fed and pasture-raised.

Sources for chicken:

Ideal - pasture-raised direct from the farm – may also be organic (ask local farmers or go to your farmer’s market) see this post about deciphering egg and poultry labels
Better - Pasture-raised chickens from local grocery or health food store – may also be organic
Acceptable - commercial and grocery store organic, “cage-free”, or “free-range”, omega-3 chickens. Many of these are also raised on feedlot premises, but may be antibiotic-and chemical (pesticides) free.
Avoid – conventional poultry from the grocery store which likely is raised on a feedlot, usually administered antibiotics, usually exposed to pesticides/herbicides, and most often given corn, soy, and grain as main source of feed.

Deciphering egg and poultry labels
More money-saving tips:
Waste not, want not: tips for saving in the kitchen
3 tips for eating organic on a budget
Proof that real food doesn’t have to cost a bundle, is nourishing, and satisfies!
Food budgets- using creativity and prioritizing for healthy eating

This post is part of Simple Lives Thursday Blog Hop, hosted this week by Sustainable Eats

Activism Green Living Healthy Living Real Food

3 Tips for Eating Organic On A Budget

www.mypicshares.com

This topic is near and dear to my heart, for all those who feel defeated when they contemplate going sustainable or organic and believe they just can’t afford it (especially in this economy). There are many ways to achieve a goal, and I believe anything you really want to do begins with the earnest desire to do it.

I was just telling someone this week about how much more sustainable the food in our house is now than it was 6 years ago when I really started to go through my kitchen and throw garbage out, and was concerned about paying attention to where my food was coming from. Back then our family had a steady income, my husband was a programmer for a dental insurance company. He didn’t like his job, but felt he needed to stay so we could continue to pay our mortgage, other bills, and feed our family.

Now we are both self-employed. We own a solar installation/sales business (Treasure Valley Solar and 42solar.com – our online solar catalog) and green IT (TVS Green Tech – information technology). We are dedicated to finding energy efficiency solutions for people, as well as maintain and support computer systems for people that use smart technology and save money by utilizing the latest in efficient equipment. Oh, and I’m now getting paid to do nutrition/health writing for several remote clients, which is awesome. Our main business has been slow, and we’ve had periods of time with no paycheck (for months, in fact). But we have made it our goal to afford healthy food and made it our number one priority, period. It has been difficult, but so far the three of us (me, my husband, and 10-year-old son) have managed not to starve even once, and still for the most part, we are eating sustainably.

Ruth Ann Bowen is the cultivator of Nurturing Naturally, who along with co-founder Rebecca Wirtz, host an online community helping connect yesterday’s pantry to today’s kitchen. “We show people how to integrate modern day convenience with time-tested traditions of the past.” I was delighted to “meet” Ruth online just last week, and went to look at her web site, which I love. Together Ruth and Rebecca share advice and recipes focused on helping people get out of the fast lane and back in the kitchen…and garden.

I want to extend my thanks to Ruth Ann for offering to help me out this week when I’m on a writing project deadline (what Godsend!) and have no time for my blog, and also express how much I appreciate what she and Rebecca do for the sustainable food community. I hope you’ll enjoy this guest post that she graciously agreed to write for Agriculture Society. I promise to return the favor when I am less occupied…soon!

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“Organic food is so expensive!” That’s usually the first response we get when discussing the topic of organic food. We’ve spent many hours scouring and searching for organic deals and we’ve discovered these three tips for buying organic food on a budget. A few caveats, however, before we launch into our tips: First, we highly recommend frequenting your local farm markets for fresh produce. The quality is so much greater and we believe in fully supporting small farmers. Second, if you are able, grow your own garden! This is by far the cheapest way to feed your family nutrient dense, pesticide-free food. Third, when it comes to meat, we prefer buying a grass-fed cow from a local farm you trust. But knowing these aren’t an option for everyone, here are three ways we’ve found to enjoy a budget-friendly, organic household:

1. Think outside the grocery store.

Most large grocery stores feature an organic section these days. But many times, they aren’t the best place for deals. We’ve discovered stores like Big Lots http://www.biglots.com/ and Ollie’s http://www.olliesbargainoutlet.com/default.aspx carry a selection of organic products at greatly reduced prices. And we’ve been pleasantly surprised at the selection they offer including organic pasta, organic tea, organic cereal, organic soups, etc. all at great discounts.

Since discount stores won’t carry everything, check on-line for organic deals as well. We purchase quite at bit from Vitacost.com and we frequent a local organic food warehouse, Frankferd Farms who also features an online catalog.

2. Buy in Bulk

When you do find a good deal, buy in large quantities. There are two reasons for this: 1. To keep a good stock on hand (which is always a good idea), and 2. If you find a deal at a discount store, they may not carry that item again for awhile. These stores will buyout from manufacturers when they have overstocked on things, so get the bargain while you can. I have a friend who bought an entire box of the above-mentioned chicken stock and now I wish I had, too!

3. Check your cart

When discussing the price of organic food, take a look at your buying habits. Do you still have soda, chips, and canned soups in your cart? When organic food is just an add-on that’s when people see their grocery bill go up. Here’s a cost comparison of what approximately $20.00 could buy at our local western Pennsylvania supermarket, Giant Eagle:

Mainstream/Standard American Grocery Cart

6 pack of Coke in plastic bottles–$4.99
12 oz. Family Size (their description) Doritos–$3.99
4 pack Campbell’s Cream of Mushroom Soup–$4.49
Giant Eagle brand diced peaches in juice (notice they didn’t say “syrup”)—2/$4.00
Edy’s Ice Cream (1.5 qt)–$3.33 (sale price)

TOTAL: $20.80

Organic Grocery Cart

Nature’s Basket 90% lean Ground Beef, 1 lb.—$4.72
Nature’s Basket Whole Chicken, 5.28 lb–$8.92
Organic Bartlett Pears, 1.92 lb–$2.48
Organic Red Delicious Apples, 1.52 lb.–$3.02
Organic Red Grapes, 2.22 lb.—$6.64

TOTAL: $21.06

Don’t just look at the dollar amount, though. Look at the actual items. The items in the organic cart are far more healthy and filling than soda and chips. So, if you have $20.00 to spend, why not spend it on healthier food that will fill you up? By ditching the soda, chips, ice cream, etc. you’ll find filling your cart with organic isn’t as expensive as once thought!

Finding organic food bargains is possible. And with these tips in hand, you’ll be on your way to a healthier body, slimmer waistline–and a fatter wallet–in no time.

Want more ideas for saving money on real food?

Is cheap food really cheap? The hidden costs of industrial food

Waste not, want not – tips for saving in the kitchen

Food budgets – using creativity and prioritizing for healthy eating

Sustainable farming – is it practical and can it feed us all?

This post is part of Simple Lives Thursday hop (this week featured on GNOWFLGLINS).